If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right. Switch to Accessible Site

WARNING

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

Close [x]

Heavy Lifting

Heavy Lifting and Back Pain
Chiropractic Care and Core Training

Core training focuses on the deepest muscular layers of your body, including small muscles such as the multifidi and intertransversarii that lie directly on the spinal column and help move individual spinal vertebras. In order to train these deep muscles properly, the spinal vertebras need to be able to move freely throughout their full range of motion. This is where regular chiropractic care comes in. Chiropractic care identifies, analyzes, and corrects sites of limited spinal mobility, making it possible for you to optimally train your core muscles.

Returning to fitness requires an ongoing commitment of time and effort. In order to get the most out of your investment in yourself, it’s important to make sure that your body will respond effectively to your exercise activities. Regular chiropractic care helps ensure that you’ll achieve such success.

All of us who’ve experienced a back injury of one sort or another have been told at some point to “avoid heavy lifting.” That type of advice appears to be a no-brainer or at least redundant, as no one whose back is hurting is going to try to pick up an air conditioner or even a 100-foot reel of garden hose. In this context, it’s important to remember the words of Shakespeare’s Cassius: “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves”. The problem isn’t the heavy lifting, as such. The real problem is in us, that is, in our overall level of conditioning or physical fitness.

Most back injuries don’t occur as a result of heavy lifting, but rather are caused by a seemingly innocuous event such as bending over in the shower to retrieve a bar of soap that has fallen to the floor. Other likely pain-producing scenarios are bending over to place a bag of groceries in the trunk of a car bending over to tie a loose shoelace. None of these circumstances involved lifting extraordinary weight.  Rather, the common elements are lack of flexibility and lack of appropriate muscle tone and strength to support the weight of your body in a forward flexed position.

The problem isn’t lack of big muscles. Picking up a bar of soap or positioning a 15-pound grocery bag doesn’t require bulging biceps or massive lats. The problem is lack of conditioning. Most of us no longer do actual physical work on a regular basis. We spend the large majority of our day sitting, either working, reading, or watching entertainment on television or other devices. The result of such lack of activity is twofold. Muscles lose strength and muscle fibers are replaced by fat. Additionally, tendons and ligaments contract and become tight, losing their necessary composition of elastic fibers. The functional loss associated with these physiological changes is profound. We experience these change every time we feel a twinge, or worse, in our backs.

The fix is easy and primarily focuses on building up core muscle strength.1,2 Core training is directed toward your deep abdominal muscles. The main such muscle is the transverses abdominis, which surrounds your entire waist, protecting and supporting your lower back. You can think of this critically important structure as your internal weight belt. Activation of the core muscles is required for all effective physical activity.3 Without this essential foundation, any minor attempt at work, even bending over to pick up a pencil, can lead to disaster in the form of excruciating back pain.

Core training includes exercises such as the scorpion, lying windmill with bent legs, pushups, squats, and the plank. Many good books and numerous online videos are available to provide instruction in the performance of core exercises. Your chiropractor is experienced in rehabilitative exercise and will help guide you to the training methods that are best for you.

1Inani SB, Selkar SP: Effect of core stabilization exercises versus conventional exercises on pain and functional status in patients with non-specific low back pain: a randomized clinical trial. J Back Musculoskel Rehabil 26(1):37-43, 2014

2Brumitt J, et al: Core stabilization exercise prescription, part 2: a systematic review of motor control and general (global) exercise rehabilitation approaches for patients with low back pain. Sports Health 5(6):510-3, 2013

3Wang XQ, et al: A meta-analysis of core stability exercise versus general exercise for chronic low back pain. PLoS One 2012;7(12):e52082. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0052082. Epub 2012 Dec 17

Welcome to Washington Injury and Sports Performance Clinic

Welcome to Washington Injury and Sports Performance Clinic!

At our clinic, we help improve your quality of life by offering care customized to
your needs. You may be recovering from an injury, seeking to treat an ongoing condition, looking to improve athletic performance, or just want to feel healthier and more mobile. Doctor Glodzik and Doctor Osborn can help!

We will work with you address the underlying cause of soft tissue pain - pain affecting muscle, tendons, ligments, and facisa. Once your immediate pain is under control, the doctors will correct posture and gait issues, or teach you stretches and strength building exercises that will help you stay healthy and prevent future injury.

Upon your first appointment, the doctor will discuss your symptoms with you, then perform an exam to assess your mobility and reflexes. Once the doctor has made a diagnosis and determined that chiropractic care is a good fit for you, he will discuss a treatment plan to get you back to the activities you love. 

Please call 202-363-1011 with any questions you may have. 

Top 10 Chiropractic Clinics in Washington 2018
Dr. Paul J. Glodzik, DC has been recognized as one of the top Washington Chiropractic practices.
Verified by Opencare.com

Office Hours

DayOpenClose
Monday7:00am7:00pm
Tuesday7:00am7:00pm
Wednesday7:00am7:00pm
Thursday7:00am7:00pm
Friday7:00am7:00pm
SaturdayClosedClosed
SundayClosedClosed
Day Open Close
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
7:00am 7:00am 7:00am 7:00am 7:00am Closed Closed
7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm Closed Closed